Some personal news

I technically graduated back in December, but today I got to celebrate my past 3.5 years of hard work towards my degree at my university’s commencement ceremony. It was special, to say the least!

I graduated with a B.A. in Public Health Sciences with Latin honors (magna cum laude) and membership in the Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Delta Pi honors societies.

By far the best part of college was everything I learned about myself along the way. I came all the way out of the closet, met and befriended the best people I could ever hope to meet and befriend, got engaged to my incredible-gorgeous-fantastic partner, Serena, and learned how to navigate two major disabilities–bipolar and endometriosis–that I was worried would ruin my life.

Words cannot express how grateful I am for the opportunities I’ve had. I’m living my best life as a full-time writer, which goes to show that childhood dreams can come true, and I can’t wait to see what blessings are just around the corner.

I’ll be back with the book-themed content you know and love on Monday, but I couldn’t help but share this good news today. ❤

Are you a reading perfectionist?

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Ah, the Goodreads reading challenge: it’s a New Year’s resolution that’s probably more keep-able than just “working out and eating healthy” (at least it’s tangible!), but for me, it’s also a source of major overcommitment and stress.

This year, I intended to read 100 books, which seemed pretty simple at the time. I’m a fast reader, and a little under two books a week seemed eminently doable. Right?

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Wrong. Between my busy life and my own perfectionism, I feel like I’ve had to fight for every single book I manage to read this year–not a good feeling, since ostensibly reading is supposed to be fun.

Where did I go wrong?

I can think of at least one clinical reason that’s outside my control: I’ve had obsessive-compulsive disorder since I was a kid, and it often causes this same kind of overcommit-and-crash-and-burn pattern. (My obsessions and compulsions relate to organization in ways that are less “helpful” and more “quagmire.”)

But I’ve heard a lot of other avid readers and book bloggers complain of this problem, too, so I don’t think it’s just me.

After all, there are so many new books and old favorites to enjoy, and never enough time–an essay by NPR’s Linda Holmes, titled “The Sad, Beautiful Fact That We’re Going to Miss Almost Everything,” gets to the heart of this. That’s one source of perfectionist tendencies.

But worse, when you’re a book blogger, you notice that there are always others who read more than you, who write reviews better than you, who publish more content than you, and are generally just “better” at being a reader/blogger than you. It creates this weird cycle of admiration and resentment, of “I could be like that if I just put my mind to it” and then despair when you can’t measure up.

This game of comparisons that I play with myself is tremendously unhealthy, unrealistic, and unfair, and I’ve noticed it spoiling my enjoyment of reading. It’s so frustrating that my oldest and favorite hobby is getting poisoned by something so pointless.

I started this blog as a way to get myself to read more and, by extension, also to write more. It began in my final semester of college (I graduated in December 2017), when I was feeling thoroughly burnt out on my coursework and uncertain about my life path–I was initially planning to go into the public health field before I switched to freelance writing.

Reading was my escape from that, and falling in love with reading all over again convinced me that I made 100% the right choice by striking out as a freelance writer. I already accomplished my initial goals for this blog–so I think it’s time to revisit them and make some newer, healthier ones.

I want to blog as a way to celebrate the books I love and process the books I don’t. I want to blog as a way to connect with other people who love books as much as I do. And in conjunction with that, it’s time to put my foot down and read for myself and not for other people. It’s time for me to stop putting my every reading choice and habit under the microscope in comparison to others.

I’m working on eradicating perfectionism from my life wherever I can, since the thing about perfectionism is it’s not about creating something “perfect” as it is about avoiding the nasty monologue of criticism that runs 24/7 in my brain. If I let that monologue get the best of me, it’s going to eat up everything I love and continue to make me miserable. Enough is enough.

Next year, I’m skipping the Goodreads reading  challenge. This year, I’m giving myself permission to ignore it (though I’ll continue to use Goodreads–you can friend me here.)

I’m tired of being a reading perfectionist–I’d much rather enjoy reading than be some arbitrary kind of “best” at it.


Are you a reading perfectionist? Have you overcome that perfectionism? (If so, how?!) I’d love to hear all about it in the comments!

Is cataloging your home library worth it?

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Every few years I get a wild hair to document exactly how many books I own. (Spoiler alert: lots!) I’m charmed by impeccably organized shelves (yes, even the color coded ones), by personalized bookplates and meticulous handwritten lending records, and most of all, by home library catalogs that boil down all my books to one neatly alphabetized list.

It’s unsurprising, then, that I’ve tried many, many times to create a comprehensive library catalog of my own. I’ve used LibraryThing (meh), Goodreads (another meh–it’s more social network than catalog), and even Google Sheets and Excel to do it, but I always give up.

I’m a perfectionist who owns, at minimum, several hundred precious books. Cataloging them is a lot of work! Knowing how many books I have? Great. Avoiding duplicates? Double-great. Being able to look over titles and authors at a glance so I can easily come up with blog post ideas? Best of all. But even those benefits can’t quite get me over the hump of actually doing it.

Despite all that, I’m trying again. I’m using Libib.com because it’s got a clean interface and it’s free (up to about 10,000 books, that is); I’m bundling the task into spring cleaning, motivating myself by imagining old books sold back to the bookstore and new books purchased with the store credit.

Will it be worth it in the sense that cataloging my library will save me at least as much time and effort as I put into doing it? Probably not. But cataloging has always been about more than efficiency for me. It’s about the smell of old books and the realization that it’s impossible to finish everything we start.

I know I’ll never, ever read or re-read all the books on my shelves. (After all, I’m always adding more.) In a weird way, there’s something comforting about remembering that. A catalog–even a half-finished one–lets me roll around in the idea that even though I might never re-read, say, Louise Erdrich’s Love Medicine again, it’s always there just in case. I can scroll through a list of titles and authors and think happy thoughts about all the lazy afternoons I plan to spend stuffing my face with words.

Is home cataloging worth it? Not exactly. Will I do it? I’ll try. It keeps me humble.


Have you ever tried cataloging your books? Did you succeed? Worth it? Waste of time? I’d love to hear all about it in the comments!

I’m not sponsored by any of the cataloging websites and software I mentioned in this post. Opinions are all mine.

Still on hiatus!

I’m still recovering from a serious health issue that’s left me without much energy to read or write this month. I hope to be back on a regular posting schedule by April.

In the meantime, enjoy this meme I just made and am very proud of, inspired by a recent walk I took around my neighborhood:

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Additionally, I am still tweeting regularly about books, writing, and disability, as well as retweeting some of the good (bad?) memes and jokes that cross my timeline. If that’s your thing, you can follow me @maggietiede.

Thanks for bearing with me, folks!

In Review: February 2018

I don’t know about you, but link roundups make me feel like I am On Top Of Things™ somehow–like taking a few minutes to skim headlines and summaries could somehow keep me afloat in an internet that moves at the speed of light. Maybe that’s a bad habit, but I’ve decided to introduce a link roundup of my own at the end of every month just in case anyone out there enjoys the same thing.

So, for your skimming pleasure, here’s my February in Review.


I read 4 books this month:

  • Wild by Cheryl Strayed (Goodreads)
  • The Answers by Catherine Lacey (Goodreads)
  • A Loving, Faithful Animal by Josephine Rowe (Goodreads)
  • An American Marriage by Tayari Jones (Goodreads)

(Also, here’s your periodic reminder that I am on Goodreads! I’m always looking for new Goodreads buddies, so add me there if that’s your thing. ☺)

I reviewed 3 books this month:

I checked out 4 books from the library:

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I bought 1 book:

I read 5 short stories:

Short Story Roundup 2/7 | Short Story Roundup 2/14

I have read 11 books so far in 2018!


How was your month? Feel free to link to your own blog posts in the comments!

Ringing out the old year, in with the new.

I successfully survived finals, graduation, holidays, and my own soul-sucking self-doubt these past two weeks, and this is the first year in awhile that I can say I’m genuinely looking forward to the new year. In 2018, I’m starting my writing career in earnest, traveling to conferences to showcase my undergraduate public health research, and planning a wedding: my partner and I tie the knot in September!

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Just a couple of big ol’ dorks. Me on the left, my partner on the right.

It’s a lot to celebrate–and I’m also excited to make some aesthetic and content changes to this blog to bring it into the new year.

Short Story Roundup (which publishes on Wednesdays) and Friday Bookbag will continue much the same as before. Instead of Monday Reads, however–which served as my own self-motivation to actually read at least a book a week for fun in the face of mountains of homework–I’ll be publishing book reviews throughout the week.

You can still expect at least one review per week, but I’m hoping for 2-3 as my reading habits return to their pre-college state (read: voracious).

I’m also hoping to make my content more readable on mobile devices by reducing unnecessary photos and cluttered formatting, as well as making it more shareable on social media, using tools like the Twitter Card Validator to preview how links will look when shared. I welcome suggestions for ways to do this in the comments.

I’m taking this New Year’s weekend as a chance to appreciate all the good things I experienced in 2017, and to anticipate the changes 2018 will bring. Wishing everyone out there on the internet a joyous New Year’s weekend!

Off for the holidays: See you in 2018!

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I’m taking a break till January, partially for holiday travel, and partially because my reading/reviewing habits were completely thrown off by my school schedule.

Luckily, I graduate from college this week, so it won’t be an issue in the future–hurray! Even better, I’ll be freelancing full-time at that point, so you’ll be seeing me on this blog and elsewhere on the web with much greater regularity.

Happy end-of-2017, everyone. Wishing you a smooth entrance into the new year!