Holiday Weekend Bookbag, 5.27.19

FridayBookbag

Friday Holiday Weekend Bookbag is a weekly semi-annual (?) feature where I share a list of books I’ve borrowed, bought, or received recently. It’s my chance to buzz about my excitement for books I might not get the chance to review.

As you might have guessed from the totally-awesome-and-not-desperate title of this week’s Bookbag, I’ve been busy and forgetful and not great about posting things on the blog lately. The free time I have had has been spent on a marathon rewatch of the Twilight movies, which is not a course of action I recommend, exactly, but it sure is mesmerizing!

Luckily I still have a few books to chat about this weekend. Let’s dive in!


Knock Wood by Jennifer Militello

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

Knock Wood Cover
cover description: the outline of a scraggly tree is burnt into a woodgrain background.

the premise: From the back of the ARC I received from Dzanc Books this week:

“In Knock Wood, the first nonfiction collection by award-winning poet Jennifer Militello, a knock on wood to ward off illness sets in motion a chain of events and memories that call into question the very structure of time.

Anchored by a wooden ring, Militello explores her life through the lens of three intertwined elements: the story of a mentally ill aunt in an abusive marriage; a high school romance with a boy who eventually dies of a heroin overdose; and an extra-marital affair characterized by an otherworldly connection. Cause and effect reverse as significant events–an arrest for a felony committed in high school, a trip by train to meet an illicit lover, and a suicide attempt on those same New York tracks–seem to influence each other outside of time and space. As Militello delicately threads each memory to the next, she explores the themes of family damage and the precarious ties of love.”

Knock Wood will be released on August 13th, 2019 and is available for preorder.

why I’m excited: Dzanc Books sent me this ARC because they saw my glowing review of The Collected Schizophrenias by Esmé Weijun Wang, another nonfiction collection that plays around with memory and time. I’ve been on a nonfiction kick lately and I always love when poets turn to prose (why do poets always seem to be so much better at prose than prose writers are at poetry?). At 144 pages, it’s short and sweet and I’m looking forward to digging in.

The Farm by Joanne Ramos

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

The Farm Cover
cover description: There are three stylized silhouettes of pregnant bellies in pastel colors layered on top of each other.

the premise: From Goodreads:

“Nestled in the Hudson Valley is a sumptuous retreat boasting every amenity: organic meals, private fitness trainers, daily massages—and all of it for free. In fact, you get paid big money—more than you’ve ever dreamed of—to spend a few seasons in this luxurious locale. The catch? For nine months, you belong to the Farm. You cannot leave the grounds; your every move is monitored. Your former life will seem a world away as you dedicate yourself to the all-consuming task of producing the perfect baby for your überwealthy clients.

Jane, an immigrant from the Philippines and a struggling single mother, is thrilled to make it through the highly competitive Host selection process at the Farm. But now pregnant, fragile, consumed with worry for her own young daughter’s well-being, Jane grows desperate to reconnect with her life outside. Yet she cannot leave the Farm or she will lose the life-changing fee she’ll receive on delivery—or worse.”

why I’m excited: I recently found out that Kim Kardashian and Kanye West had their third baby (and now a soon-to-be-born fourth) via a surrogate. Since then I’ve spent a lot of time wondering what it must be like to be a surrogate for people that wealthy: would it be like a fun 9-month vacation from the real world, or something a little more sinister? The Farm looks like it explores exactly that line of thought, so of course I had to buy it as soon as I heard about it this week. I love coincidences like that.

The Belles by Dhonielle Clayton

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

The Belles Cover
cover description: a Black girl in a fancy dress and makeup with flowers in her hair looks over her shoulder fiercely.

the premise: From Goodreads:

“Camellia Beauregard is a Belle. In the opulent world of Orléans, Belles are revered, for they control Beauty, and Beauty is a commodity coveted above all else. In Orléans, the people are born gray, they are born damned, and only with the help of a Belle and her talents can they transform and be made beautiful.

But it’s not enough for Camellia to be just a Belle. She wants to be the favorite—the Belle chosen by the Queen of Orléans to live in the royal palace, to tend to the royal family and their court, to be recognized as the most talented Belle in the land. But once Camellia and her Belle sisters arrive at court, it becomes clear that being the favorite is not everything she always dreamed it would be. Behind the gilded palace walls live dark secrets, and Camellia soon learns that the very essence of her existence is a lie—that her powers are far greater, and could be more dangerous, than she ever imagined. And when the queen asks Camellia to risk her own life and help the ailing princess by using Belle powers in unintended ways, Camellia now faces an impossible decision. 

With the future of Orléans and its people at stake, Camellia must decide—save herself and her sisters and the way of the Belles—or resuscitate the princess, risk her own life, and change the ways of her world forever.”

why I’m excited: This book got so much buzz last year that I’m surprised I didn’t pick it up sooner. (Books published by Disney tend to be like that. I assume this one is well on its way to being a TV series on Freeform.) I’m a sucker for palace intrigue novels and any novel with the word “opulent” in the description, so I assume I’m going to have a lot of fun with this one.


What’s in your bookbag this week? Do you have any exciting weekend reading plans? Let me know in the comments, and feel free to link to your own book reviews and blog posts!

Friday Bookbag, 5.10.19

FridayBookbag

Friday Bookbag is a weekly feature where I share a list of books I’ve borrowed, bought, or received during the week. It’s my chance to buzz about my excitement for books I might not get the chance to review.

I didn’t think I’d get a chance to write a Friday Bookbag at all this week, after spending all day Wednesday and yesterday packing, and all of this morning (and most of the afternoon) moving stuff into our new place. Luckily everything went way faster than I thought it would. I’m unbelievably sore and tired, and more than a little cranky, but we’re in! I’ve got internet, a comfy couch, snacks, and my laptop. That’s all this blogger really needs.

Let’s dive in!


A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

A Tale for the Time Being cover
cover description: The cover is made up of horizontal stripes with different images, including a forest, a book, waves, and what looks like the face of a child or a doll.

the premise: From Goodreads:

In Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao has decided there’s only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates’ bullying, but before she ends it all, Nao plans to document the life of her great-grandmother, a Buddhist nun who’s lived more than a century. A diary is Nao’s only solace—and will touch lives in a ways she can scarcely imagine.

Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox—possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao’s drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future. 

why I’m excited: I first picked this up at the library a year or so ago, but never got around to reading it, so this week I snapped it up while its e-book version was on sale for $1.99 (as of this writing, it’s still on sale at Amazon). The premise of this novel reminds me a bit of Life of Pi by Yann Martel: the novelist-named-Ruth part is meta, and Nao’s life sounds like a sort of coming-of-age story smashed together with a disaster story. This sounds lovely and unusual and sad. I can’t wait.

I Believe in a Thing Called Love by Maurene Goo

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

I Believe in a Thing Called Love Cover
cover description: A Korean American teen girl is smiling. To her right, a teen boy stands mostly out of the frame. The image is black and white with pink and yellow accents.

the premise: From Goodreads:

“Desi Lee believes anything is possible if you have a plan. That’s how she became student body president. Varsity soccer star. And it’s how she’ll get into Stanford. But—she’s never had a boyfriend. In fact, she’s a disaster in romance, a clumsy, stammering humiliation magnet whose botched attempts at flirting have become legendary with her friends. So when the hottest human specimen to have ever lived walks into her life one day, Desi decides to tackle her flirting failures with the same zest she’s applied to everything else in her life. She finds guidance in the Korean dramas her father has been obsessively watching for years—where the hapless heroine always seems to end up in the arms of her true love by episode ten. It’s a simple formula, and Desi is a quick study. Armed with her “K Drama Steps to True Love,” Desi goes after the moody, elusive artist Luca Drakos—and boat rescues, love triangles, and staged car crashes ensue. But when the fun and games turn to true feels, Desi finds out that real love is about way more than just drama.”

why I’m excited: I’ve been loving romances and romantic comedies lately, so I thought I’d give a YA one a spin. This got great reviews when it came out in 2017, and that cover is too darn cute!

Everything Here is Beautiful by Mira T. Lee

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

Everything Here is Beautiful Cover
cover description: The lower half of a woman’s face is visible. She looks serious. The rest of the cover is made up of multicolored silhouettes of butterflies.

the premise: From Goodreads:

“Two Chinese-American sisters—Miranda, the older, responsible one, always her younger sister’s protector; Lucia, the headstrong, unpredictable one, whose impulses are huge and, often, life changing. When Lucia starts hearing voices, it is Miranda who must find a way to reach her sister. Lucia impetuously plows ahead, but the bitter constant is that she is, in fact, mentally ill. Lucia lives life on a grand scale, until, inevitably, she crashes to earth. 

Miranda leaves her own self-contained life in Switzerland to rescue her sister again—but only Lucia can decide whether she wants to be saved. The bonds of sisterly devotion stretch across oceans—but what does it take to break them?”

why I’m excited: I don’t normally pay a ton of attention to author blurbs–I like to read reviews instead–but a glowing recommendation from Celeste Ng did sell me on this one. (Ng wrote Little Fires Everywhere, one of my favorite books of recent years.) This looks like a sensitive, complex, and loving portrait of mental illness and the ways it can strain already-complicated family relationships. This is something Celeste Ng is also really good at, hence why I gave her blurb so much weight! I’m really looking forward to reading this.


What’s in your bookbag this week? Do you have any exciting weekend reading plans? Let me know in the comments, and feel free to link to your own book reviews and blog posts!

Friday Bookbag, 5.3.19

FridayBookbag

Friday Bookbag is a weekly feature where I share a list of books I’ve borrowed, bought, or received during the week. It’s my chance to buzz about my excitement for books I might not get the chance to review.

My wife and I officially closed on our new condo this week! This interminable move is about to officially come to an end. I’m currently on cloud nine. In fact, I’ve been so excited that I’ve found it a little difficult to focus on reading all the books I bring home. 😬 It doesn’t help that our new place is right next door to a massive library, so this problem is likely only going to get worse. Sigh. (Good thing it’s not really a problem, no?)

This week I’ve got a daring historical spy romance, a literary Lizzie Borden story, a Gilded Age sci-fi novel, and a whole lot more in my super-sized bookbag. Let’s dive in!


An Extraordinary Union by Alyssa Cole

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

An Extraordinary Union
cover description: a Black woman wearing a white Civil War era dress stands in a doorway and looks back over her shoulder with an anxious expression.

the premise: From Goodreads:

“Elle Burns is a former slave with a passion for justice and an eidetic memory. Trading in her life of freedom in Massachusetts, she returns to the indignity of slavery in the South—to spy for the Union Army.

Malcolm McCall is a detective for Pinkerton’s Secret Service. Subterfuge is his calling, but he’s facing his deadliest mission yet—risking his life to infiltrate a Rebel enclave in Virginia.

Two undercover agents who share a common cause—and an undeniable attraction—Malcolm and Elle join forces when they discover a plot that could turn the tide of the war in the Confederacy’s favor. Caught in a tightening web of wartime intrigue, and fighting a fiery and forbidden love, Malcolm and Elle must make their boldest move to preserve the Union at any cost—even if it means losing each other…”

why I’m excited: First of all, Alyssa Cole is a wildly acclaimed author (I already own, and am soon planning to read, A Princess in Theory, a contemporary romance of hers). Second of all, this premise would stand on its own: Civil War spies falling in love while deep undercover and in deadly danger? It doesn’t get more gripping than that.

See What I Have Done by Sarah Schmidt

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

See What I Have Done Cover
cover description: A pigeon’s head seems to melt into a blue blob of dripping paint on a cream-colored background.

the premise: See What I Have Done tells the story of the infamous Lizzie Borden murders through the eyes of four unreliable narrators: Lizzie herself, her sister Emma, their housemaid Bridget, and a stranger. Emma comforts the distraught Lizzie in the aftermath of the murders of their father and stepmother, but as Lizzie slowly pieces together her fragmented, fateful memories of August 4, 1892, the bonds between the two sisters will be tested.

why I’m excited: I’m curious about this one. Reviews seem to be mixed, I think the premise is a teensy bit overwrought (the memory weirdness and unreliable narrator components in particular), and it doesn’t seem like it follows the historical record very closely. But I enjoy reading about the Lizzie Borden case enough that I decided to brave what could be a big disappointment. I’m hoping it’ll be reminiscent of Alias Grace, the Margaret Atwood novel turned excellent Netflix series about a similar 19th century double murder.

MEM by Bethany C. Morrow

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

Mem Paperback Cover
cover description: Two faces that share one neck and upper body are silhouetted against a red background.

the premise: From Goodreads:

“Set in the glittering art deco world of a century ago, MEM makes one slight alteration to history: a scientist in Montreal discovers a method allowing people to have their memories extracted from their minds, whole and complete. The Mems exist as mirror-images of their source ― zombie-like creatures destined to experience that singular memory over and over, until they expire in the cavernous Vault where they are kept. 

And then there is Dolores Extract #1, the first Mem capable of creating her own memories. An ageless beauty shrouded in mystery, she is allowed to live on her own, and create her own existence, until one day she is summoned back to the Vault.”

why I’m excited: I have to admit that I’m confused by this premise as much as I’m intrigued by it. What’s…the point of having a Mem, exactly? Why is it useful to have an automaton thing relive a singular memory over and over? I’m hoping it’ll be clearer once I start reading. Anyway, Blade Runner meets The Great Gatsby is a cool enough aesthetic to make me forgive this book an awful lot of ills, if there are indeed a lot of ills here.

The Library at Mount Char by Scott Hawkins

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

The Library at Mount Char Cover
cover description: The sun sets behind a dark house with lit windows. The house is visible through a hole burnt in book pages.

the premise: I’m not really sure I know. There’s an awfully long description on Goodreads, a bit longer than I’m willing to copy over here. Let’s go with just this section of it:

“A missing God.
A library with the secrets to the universe. 
A woman too busy to notice her heart slipping away.”

And this one, too:

“Now, Father is missing—perhaps even dead—and the Library that holds his secrets stands unguarded. And with it, control over all of creation.”

Sounds awesome, no?

why I’m excited: It’s a book about a supernatural library and, it seems, a God who lives in a supernatural library. Hell yeah, I’m excited for this one. This seems a little reminiscent of American Gods, a book I really enjoyed; I’m a sucker for stories about mortals and immortals colliding, and I especially love the ones where the main character is at risk of losing their humanity. I can’t wait to read this.

How to Love a Jamaican: Stories by Alexia Arthurs

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

How to Love a Jamaican Cover
cover description: stylized, painted vines burst with orange fruit and purple flowers against a bright yellow background.

the premise: From Goodreads:

“Tenderness and cruelty, loyalty and betrayal, ambition and regret—Alexia Arthurs navigates these tensions to extraordinary effect in her debut collection about Jamaican immigrants and their families back home. Sweeping from close-knit island communities to the streets of New York City and midwestern university towns, these eleven stories form a portrait of a nation, a people, and a way of life.

In “Light Skinned Girls and Kelly Rowlands,” an NYU student befriends a fellow Jamaican whose privileged West Coast upbringing has blinded her to the hard realities of race. In “Mash Up Love,” a twin’s chance sighting of his estranged brother—the prodigal son of the family—stirs up unresolved feelings of resentment. In “Bad Behavior,” a mother and father leave their wild teenage daughter with her grandmother in Jamaica, hoping the old ways will straighten her out. In “Mermaid River,” a Jamaican teenage boy is reunited with his mother in New York after eight years apart. In “The Ghost of Jia Yi,” a recently murdered international student haunts a despairing Jamaican athlete recruited to an Iowa college. And in “Shirley from a Small Place,” a world-famous pop star retreats to her mother’s big new house in Jamaica, which still holds the power to restore something vital.”

why I’m excited: There’s a lot of great stuff happening in the short story space, and this collection looks like no exception. I’m especially loving short story collections that tackle diasporas: I recently reviewed and loved Useful Phrases for Immigrants by May-Lee Chai and White Dancing Elephants by Chaya Bhuvaneswar, both of which similarly driven by diasporic experience. A short story collection seems like the perfect format to capture experiences that are so wide-ranging and similar at the same time. I’m looking forward to this.

No One Can Pronounce My Name by Rakesh Satyal

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

No One Can Pronounce My Name Cover
cover description: a drab blue and white striped tie hangs like a necklace over a bright pink and gold sari background.

the premise: From Goodreads:

“In a suburb outside Cleveland, a community of Indian Americans has settled into lives that straddle the divide between Eastern and Western cultures. For some, America is a bewildering and alienating place where coworkers can’t pronounce your name but will eagerly repeat the Sanskrit phrases from their yoga class. Harit, a lonely Indian immigrant in his midforties, lives with his mother who can no longer function after the death of Harit’s sister, Swati. In a misguided attempt to keep both himself and his mother sane, Harit has taken to dressing up in a sari every night to pass himself off as his sister. Meanwhile, Ranjana, also an Indian immigrant in her midforties, has just seen her only child, Prashant, off to college. Worried that her husband has begun an affair, she seeks solace by writing paranormal romances in secret. When Harit and Ranjana’s paths cross, they begin a strange yet necessary friendship that brings to light their own passions and fears.”

why I’m excited: This just looks lovely. I love this kind of quiet-with-a-touch-of-humor, grief-stricken family drama (the premise reminds me a little bit of Goodbye, Vitamin by Rachel Khong and Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng). I’m looking forward to spending an afternoon with this one.


What’s in your bookbag this week? Do you have any exciting weekend reading plans? Let me know in the comments, and feel free to link to your own book reviews and blog posts!

Friday Bookbag, 4.26.19

FridayBookbag

Friday Bookbag is a weekly feature where I share a list of books I’ve borrowed, bought, or received during the week. It’s my chance to buzz about my excitement for books I might not get the chance to review.

It’s like I learned nothing from last week! I kept buying books way faster than I’m reading them. (Shout out to Book Riot’s daily book deals newsletter, which is the best worst thing that’s ever happened to me.) Luckily my reading slump seems to have broken and I’m back to reading more, if not quite enough. Expect some interesting book reviews coming soon.

Let’s dive into all my bad great decisions this week!


The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

The Poet X Coverthe premise: From Goodreads:

“Xiomara Batista feels unheard and unable to hide in her Harlem neighborhood. Ever since her body grew into curves, she has learned to let her fists and her fierceness do the talking.

But Xiomara has plenty she wants to say, and she pours all her frustration and passion onto the pages of a leather notebook, reciting the words to herself like prayers—especially after she catches feelings for a boy in her bio class named Aman, who her family can never know about. With Mami’s determination to force her daughter to obey the laws of the church, Xiomara understands that her thoughts are best kept to herself.

So when she is invited to join her school’s slam poetry club, she doesn’t know how she could ever attend without her mami finding out, much less speak her words out loud. But still, she can’t stop thinking about performing her poems.

Because in the face of a world that may not want to hear her, Xiomara refuses to be silent.”

why I’m excited: Slam poetry–its fiercely loving community and its empowering vulnerability–are ripe for a YA novel, especially one about an Afro Latina girl fighting rape culture and abuse. That premise + myriad rave reviews and awards mean that this book is guaranteed to make me Feel Things. I can’t wait.

The Emissary by Yōko Tawada (translated by Margaret Mitsutani)

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

The Emissary Coverthe premise: From Goodreads:

“Japan, after suffering from a massive irreparable disaster, cuts itself off from the world. Children are so weak they can barely stand or walk: the only people with any get-go are the elderly. Mumei lives with his grandfather Yoshiro, who worries about him constantly. They carry on a day-to-day routine in what could be viewed as a post-Fukushima time, with all the children born ancient—frail and gray-haired, yet incredibly compassionate and wise. Mumei may be enfeebled and feverish, but he is a beacon of hope, full of wit and free of self-pity and pessimism. Yoshiro concentrates on nourishing Mumei, a strangely wonderful boy who offers “the beauty of the time that is yet to come.”

A delightful, irrepressibly funny book, The Emissary is filled with light. Yoko Tawada, deftly turning inside-out “the curse,” defies gravity and creates a playful joyous novel out of a dystopian one, with a legerdemain uniquely her own.”

why I’m excited: Researching nuclear disaster is a hobby of mine (sort of related to a novel I’m writing, sort of just because I find it fascinating), so the connection to Fukushima sold me on this book immediately. It also looks short, sweet, and funny, meaning it’s going to be a good in-between book if I’m getting bogged down in heavier, denser stuff. It’s either going to be weird and off-putting, or weird and great. Either way, it’ll be interesting!

Young Jane Young by Gabrielle Zevin

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

Young Jane Young Coverthe premise: From Amazon:

“Aviva Grossman, an ambitious congressional intern in Florida, makes the mistake of having an affair with her (married) boss. When the affair comes to light, the popular congressman doesn’t take the fall. But Aviva does, and her life is over before it hardly begins: slut-shamed, she becomes a late-night talk show punch line, anathema to politics. She sees no way out but to change her name and move to a remote town in Maine. This time, she tries to be smarter about her life and strives to raise her daughter, Ruby, to be strong and confident. But when, at the urging of others, Aviva decides to run for public office, that long-ago mistake trails her via the Internet and catches up—an inescapable scarlet A. In the digital age, the past is never, ever, truly past. And it’s only a matter of time until Ruby finds out who her mother was and is forced to reconcile that person with the one she knows.”

why I’m excited: This basically feels like Monica Lewinsky: The Novel, and I’m here for it. Ripped-from-the-headlines stories can get creepy and/or ham-handed, fast, but this novel sounds self-aware, complex (I particularly love the idea of the intergenerational stuff between Aviva and Ruby), and funny enough to sidestep those pitfalls. Fingers crossed!

Dead Girls: Essays on Surviving an American Obsession by Alice Bolin

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

Dead Girls Coverthe premise: From Goodreads:

“A collection of poignant, perceptive essays that expertly blends the personal and political in an exploration of American culture through the lens of our obsession with dead women.

In her debut collection, Alice Bolin turns a critical eye to literature and pop culture, the way media consumption reflects American society, and her own place within it. From essays on Joan Didion and James Baldwin to Twin Peaks, Britney Spears, and Serial, Bolin illuminates our widespread obsession with women who are abused, killed, and disenfranchised, and whose bodies (dead and alive) are used as props to bolster a man’s story.”

why I’m excited: I’m obsessed with the dead girls obsession, so this looks about perfect for me. Earlier this year I read The Hot One by Carolyn Murnick, a book with a somewhat similar premise, which I didn’t love. The essay excerpt of The Hot One over at The Cut contained all the best parts of that book and trimmed the bits I didn’t like, so I’m hoping that essays might be a better format with which to tackle the topic. I’m very much looking forward to this.


What’s in your bookbag this week? Do you have any exciting weekend reading plans? Let me know in the comments, and feel free to link to your own book reviews and blog posts!

Friday Bookbag, 4.19.19

FridayBookbag

Friday Bookbag is a weekly feature where I share a list of books I’ve borrowed, bought, or received during the week. It’s my chance to buzz about my excitement for books I might not get the chance to review.

Happy start to Passover, and a little later this weekend, happy Easter! Spring also tends to feel like a holiday all its own here in the Twin Cities. It’s been a long, frigid, snowy winter and I’m ready for warm weather. (Although I’m sure I’ll be decrying the hot sun and steam and sweat shortly. Give it a month.)

I’ve also been taking an unfortunate, unintentional holiday of sorts from reading lately. I just don’t have the headspace or energy to read. In addition to my health problems earlier this year, I’m also in the process of moving, which brings a ton of stress and headaches (the literal noise-and-paint-smell kind) with it. It’s going to be so nice once we’re finished, but holy smokes, I’m tired.

So while I’ve only read 9 books so far this year (ugh), I’ve predictably continued the book buying and acquiring apace, like any book lover worth their salt. Let’s dive in to this week’s titles! There are some serious good’uns here that I’m hoping will snap me out of my slump.


Alif the Unseen by G. Willow Wilson

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

Alif the Unseen Coverthe premise: From Goodreads:

“In an unnamed Middle Eastern security state, a young Arab-Indian hacker shields his clients—dissidents, outlaws, Islamists, and other watched groups—from surveillance and tries to stay out of trouble. He goes by Alif—the first letter of the Arabic alphabet, and a convenient handle to hide behind. The aristocratic woman Alif loves has jilted him for a prince chosen by her parents, and his computer has just been breached by the state’s electronic security force, putting his clients and his own neck on the line. Then it turns out his lover’s new fiancé is the “Hand of God,” as they call the head of state security, and his henchmen come after Alif, driving him underground. 

When Alif discovers The Thousand and One Days, the secret book of the jinn, which both he and the Hand suspect may unleash a new level of information technology, the stakes are raised and Alif must struggle for life or death, aided by forces seen and unseen.”

why I’m excited: It’s hard to pick just a few things to write about here. I love the way it seems to blend the real world and fantasy, I love YA stories about hacker teens rebelling against authoritarian governments (as cliché as it may be), and it’s awfully nice to see YA dystopi-fantasy (it’s a thing, right?) set outside a white and culturally Christian lens. The Middle Eastern futurist cover design is also quite lovely to behold. This looks like it will be a fun adventure.

The Paying Guests by Sarah Waters

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

The Paying Guests Coverthe premise: In the aftermath of World War I, London is in upheaval, and so is the household of widow Mrs. Wray and her spinster daughter Frances. Impoverished in their villa that was once full of servants and the men of the family, they are forced to take in lodgers, a modern couple n amed Lilian and Leonard Barber. Then “passions mount and frustration gathers” (from Goodreads)…and, it’s a Sarah Waters novel, so…yeah. Hell yeah!

why I’m excited: It’s a Sarah Waters novel! If you’re a bi, pan, or lesbian woman, ’nuff said. (If you’re not familiar with her work, she writes thrillingly plotted historical novels about women who love–and have hot sex with–other women.) My wife and I love her work (we bonded over it back in our baby lesbian days!), so I was happy to snap this one up when it was on sale for Kindle recently.

If you’re not sold yet, USA Today called it “volcanically sexy.” Nice.

Here and Now and Then by Mike Chen

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

Here and Now and Then Coverthe premise: Kin Stewart seems like an ordinary man on the surface. He works in IT and lives in suburban San Francisco with his wife and daughter. But secretly he’s a time-traveling secret agent who got stranded in 1990s San Francisco from 2142 by mistake. He’s happy where he is and tells no one about his past, until his future rescue team shows up way too late to save him, but definitely on time to ruin his new family. Kin needs to fight against his own failing memory and his former bosses in order to protect his daughter, Miranda, from a future in which she never existed.

why I’m excited: This sounds like a sweet, simple read (despite all the time traveling) about family and love and memory. Its genre blending sounds super cool and I’m always a sucker for two-families stories (Kin apparently left one family back in 2142). I don’t have much else to say about this one except that it looks nice and is getting great reviews. What more do you need?

Wild Beauty by Anna-Marie McLemore

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

Wild Beauty Coverthe premise: From Goodreads:

“For nearly a century, the Nomeolvides women have tended the grounds of La Pradera, the lush estate gardens that enchant guests from around the world. They’ve also hidden a tragic legacy: if they fall in love too deeply, their lovers vanish. But then, after generations of vanishings, a strange boy appears in the gardens.

The boy is a mystery to Estrella, the Nomeolvides girl who finds him, and to her family, but he’s even more a mystery to himself; he knows nothing more about who he is or where he came from than his first name. As Estrella tries to help Fel piece together his unknown past, La Pradera leads them to secrets as dangerous as they are magical in this stunning exploration of love, loss, and family.”

why I’m excited: This just sounds so lovely. It reminds me a little of Nova Ren Suma’s A Room Away from the Wolveswhich I read and was moved by so deeply I couldn’t even bring myself to review it. This also reminds me a little bit of the themes of memory and family in the movie Coco. (The name Nomeolvides translates to “don’t forget me.”) Stories about bonds between women, tragic love, and unreliable memory are total catnip for me. I can’t wait to lose an afternoon to this one.


What’s in your bookbag this week? Do you have any exciting weekend reading plans? Let me know in the comments, and feel free to link to your own book reviews and blog posts!

Friday Bookbag, 3.15.19

FridayBookbag

Friday Bookbag is a weekly feature where I share a list of books I’ve borrowed, bought, or received during the week. It’s my chance to buzz about my excitement for books I might not get the chance to review.

This week I indulged in some Barnes & Noble wandering (looking for the print copy of The New Yorker that I appeared in!) and some e-book bargain hunting. I’ve been watching my spending closely over the past few months since I took so much time off of work, so I’d almost forgotten how nice it is to wander between bookstore shelves, consumed with the possibility of the damn good stories each title might hold. Lovely.

Before we dive in, I wanted to share that my heart goes out to New Zealand today and to the Muslim community around the world. I’m praying for healing, justice, and a strong rebuke of the white nationalist terror that is on the upswing online and globally. Here is a list of places you can donate to support victims of the attack and the wider Muslim community in New Zealand.

Here are the books I picked up this week:


My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

My Sister the Serial Killer Coverthe premise: Korede is used to cleaning up after her serial killer sister, Ayoola. She keeps Ayoola’s secrets and tries to mind her own business; family comes first, after all. But when Ayoola begins to pursue a doctor whom Korede loves, putting his life at risk, Korede must choose which beloved to save.

why I’m excited: This book sounds absolutely bananas, like a grown-up and Nigerian version of Slice of Cherry by Dia Reeves, a YA novel (one of my favorites!) about a set of supernatural serial killer sisters. I mean, this novel can only go spectacularly or horribly, right? And even if it goes horribly, it’s going to put on quite a show. Family, murder, love, secrets–it doesn’t get more deliciously soapy than that.

The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

The Bear and the Nightingale Coverthe premise: At the edge of the Russian wilderness, Vasilisa listens to her nurse’s fairy tales. Her favorite is the story of Frost, a blue-eyed winter demon who steals unwary souls. The village honors the spirits to protect themselves, until Vasilisa’s widowed father brings home a devout wife from Moscow, who’s determined to tame the village and her rebellious stepdaughter. Evil begins to stalk the village, and Vasilisa must call upon secret powers to protect her family from a supernatural threat.

why I’m excited: I live in a cold and sometimes frightening climate myself (for example: right now, in March, there are still knee-deep snowdrifts outside my front door!), so I have a soft spot for fantasy built around Russian folklore. This novel looks to have it all: evil spirits, evil stepmothers, dangerous protective gifts. Hell yeah. I can’t wait to curl up with a cup of hot chocolate to enjoy this one. (It’s the first in the Winternight trilogy.)

Serpent in the Heather by Kay Kenyon

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

Serpent in the Heather Coverthe premise: From the back cover:

Summer, 1936. In England, an assassin is loose. Someone is killing young people who possess Talents. As terror overtakes Britain, Kim Tavistock, now officially employed by England’s Secret Intelligence Service, is sent on her first mission to the remote Sulcliffe Castle in Wales, to use her cover as a journalist to infiltrate a spiritualist cult that may have ties to the murders. Meanwhile, Kim’s father, trained spy Julian Tavistock, runs his own parallel investigation–and discovers the terrifying Nazi plot behind the serial killings…

why I’m excited: This is actually the second book in Kay Kenyon’s Dark Talents series, something I didn’t realize when I bought it. (It’s not written anywhere!) The fact that the publisher is so blasé about the novel’s place in the trilogy makes me hope it’ll work as a stand-alone, since this premise is just as bananas as My Sister, the Serial Killer and also features Nazis. Nazi serial killers! Checkmate, my wallet. I had to get it.

My wife is a hardcore WWII history buff and also a big fan of the Parasol Protectorate series by Gail Carriger, so this is right up her alley. She’s the one who picked it off the shelf. We’ll be fighting over it, I’m sure.

Authority and Acceptance by Jeff VanderMeer

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

Authority Coverthe premise: Authority and Acceptance are the sequels to Annihilation, which I reviewed some months ago. Together, they make up the Area X trilogy, about a lush, remote, ever-expanding land that’s deadly, full of mysteries, and seems to threaten human life as we know it. Yay! (The first book was adapted into a movie by Alex Garland, but the books definitely take things in a different direction.)

Acceptance Coverwhy I’m excited: I didn’t love everything about Annihilation, but damn, did it get under my skin. I think about it and talk about it all the time. If you love nature, if you’re worried about climate change, if you’re deeply concerned with what humans are doing to the planet, you have to read this trilogy. It’s about all of that anxiety without being too literal about it. From what I’ve heard, Authority and Acceptance don’t pick up where the first book left off: they go in entirely new and exciting directions. I can’t wait.


What’s in your bookbag this week? Do you have any exciting weekend reading plans? Let me know in the comments, and feel free to link to your own book reviews and blog posts!

Friday Bookbag (plus a personal story), 2.8.19

FridayBookbag

Friday Bookbag is a weekly feature where I share a list of books I’ve borrowed, bought, or received during the week. It’s my chance to buzz about my excitement for books I might not get the chance to review.

But first, story time: As some of you may know, I had a pretty major surgery yesterday. (A total hysterectomy, in order to treat my endometriosis and related pain.) I’m happy to say that the surgery was a major success. I’m extremely emotional about it, because even though the post-surgery pain is not fun and I’m too weak to sit up without help right now, I actually feel better after surgery than I did before. I literally felt better as soon as I woke up. It’s incredible.

I’ve been suffering with this condition for years and had pretty much lost hope I’d ever get relief. I still have a long recovery ahead and there’s a strong possibility I will continue to deal with some endometriosis pain in addition to my everyday fibromyalgia pain, but both conditions should be much improved now. (The endometriosis was triggering fibromyalgia flares and vice versa. That should no longer be the case.) I’m praying that this hysterectomy closes the book on the worst pain and illness I’ve ever experienced in my life. My doctors are hopeful it will, so I’m hopeful, too.

Here’s to more reading, writing, and blogging in the future. And PSA: if you’re suffering debilitating menstrual pain, I implore you to take that shit seriously. It’s not normal to be vomiting with pain during periods. It’s not normal to be laid up for 2-3 (or 4-5) weeks out of every month because of your periods. It’s not normal to be too weak to eat or walk or think or take the bus by yourself because of your periods. Please take your pain seriously and fight for the care you deserve. I’m so glad I did.

/end story time. Now, back to the books! This week I’m featuring three exciting reads by Black women authors: two new ones I bought recently, plus an old favorite that’s just gone on deep sale. Happy Black History Month!


How Long ’til Black Future Month?: Stories by N.K. Jemisin

How Long Til Black Future Month Cover

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

the premise: From Goodreads:

In these stories, Jemisin sharply examines modern society, infusing magic into the mundane, and drawing deft parallels in the fantasy realms of her imagination. Dragons and hateful spirits haunt the flooded city of New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. In a parallel universe, a utopian society watches our world, trying to learn from our mistakes. A black mother in the Jim Crow south must figure out how to save her daughter from a fey offering impossible promises. And in the Hugo award-nominated short story “The City Born Great,” a young street kid fights to give birth to an old metropolis’s soul.

why I’m excited:I’ve been dying to read N.K. Jemisin’s critically acclaimed work for years, but the timing’s never seemed to work out. I’ve also been dying to read more sci-fi short stories, especially with recent work like “Say, She Toy” by Chesya Burke and “Welcome to Your Authentic Indian Experience” by Rebecca Roanhorse knocking my socks off.

It’s like N.K. Jemisin read my mind and combined my sci-fi wishes into one awesome package in How Long ’til Black Future Month?. Every single story mentioned in that Goodreads summary sounds fascinating to me. That cover is gorgeous. And during a Black History Month that’s already been pretty miserable for Black Americans, I love the idea of immersing myself in a Black Future Month instead.

The Mothers by Brit Bennett

The Mothers Cover

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

the premise: From Goodreads:

It is the last season of high school life for Nadia Turner, a rebellious, grief-stricken, seventeen-year-old beauty. Mourning her own mother’s recent suicide, she takes up with the local pastor’s son. Luke Sheppard is twenty-one, a former football star whose injury has reduced him to waiting tables at a diner. They are young; it’s not serious. But the pregnancy that results from this teen romance—and the subsequent cover-up—will have an impact that goes far beyond their youth. As Nadia hides her secret from everyone, including Aubrey, her God-fearing best friend, the years move quickly. Soon, Nadia, Luke, and Aubrey are full-fledged adults and still living in debt to the choices they made that one seaside summer, caught in a love triangle they must carefully maneuver, and dogged by the constant, nagging question: What if they had chosen differently? The possibilities of the road not taken are a relentless haunt.

why I’m excited: You all already know how much I love the books that bridge the gap between YA and adult fiction. The Mothers looks like it will do that, and be tremendously complex and interesting to boot. I love that it seems to take teens’ issues seriously. I’m genuinely excited to see a love triangle between a “beauty,” “pastor’s son,” and “former football star” in a critically acclaimed literary fiction novel. Yessss! I think the current array of typical literary fiction protagonists is incredibly limited, and I’m looking forward to spending some time with Bennett’s characters in contrast. Also, teen pregnancies are so often flattened into metaphors or deuses-ex-machina, but I trust The Mothers will do much better. (Its gush of positive reviews seems to suggest that, anyway.)

Also-also, that cover is gorgeous. I want it on a poster on my wall.

Bonus Round:

9780544786769

This Is Just My Face: Try Not to Stare by Gabourey Sidibe is currently on sale for $2.99 on Kindle. (If you’re a Kindle Unlimited subscriber, it’s available to read for free through that service, too.)

I reviewed This Is Just My Face last year and really loved it. Reading Sidibe’s memoir is like going to the coolest, funniest, realest sleepover of your life. She writes in a conversational, down-to-earth, self-deprecating (but also self-loving) style that’s the antithesis of what you would expect from a typical celebrity memoir. She’s lived a genuinely interesting life full of interesting stories (like her parents’ green card marriage, her summer stuck in Senegal with her brother, and her time as a phone sex operator and how it prepared her for acting).

You might know Sidibe best from the movie Precious or the shows Empire and American Horror Story: Coven, but I actually love her presence as a writer and social media personality the best. If you haven’t read it already, This Is Just My Face is definitely worth picking up during this sale.


What’s in your bookbag this week? Do you have any exciting weekend reading plans? Let me know in the comments, and feel free to link to your own book reviews and blog posts!