Friday Bookbag, 5.4.18

FridayBookbag

Greetings, and May the Fourth be with you!

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With that out of the way, we can get down to the business of Friday Bookbag, a weekly feature where I share a list of books I’ve borrowed, bought, or received during the week. It’s my chance to buzz about my excitement for books I might not get the chance to review.

This week I’ve got a thrilling spy-novel-slash-marriage-drama and a sweet, funny romance about a fake wedding date that turns into something more. Let’s dive in!


The Italian Party by Christina Lynch

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

9781250147837the premise: Newlyweds Scottie and Michael move to Sienna, Italy in 1956. Little do they know that they’re about to uncover explosive and dangerous secrets–ones on an international scale, and more intimate ones they have chosen to keep from one another. The Italian Party is a thrilling spy novel that’s also about America’s messy position on the world stage.

why I’m excited: Spies! Mid-century drama! A dissolving marriage! A sensual exploration of Italy! Thoughtful criticism of American foreign policy! This book has so many ingredients that appeal to me that it’s hard to boil down my interest in this book to a sentence or two. Suffice to say that I’m sold!

The Wedding Date by Jasmine Guillory

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

9780399587665the premise: Alexa Monroe gets stuck in an elevator with Drew Nichols and, though she’s not usually the spontaneous type, she finds herself agreeing to be his fake date for his ex’s wedding. But these two high-powered professionals find that they’re in for more than they bargained for when their fake date turns into real sparks flying.

why I’m excited: Goodness gracious, I love romance. I don’t write about it a lot on this blog because a) I don’t like to review it, since my feelings on romance novels tend to be of the gushy and incoherent type (I don’t know how Smart Bitches does it) and b) I’ve been distracted by other genres for the past few months. This book feels like the perfect stepping-stone back into romance for me: an utterly charming premise, rave reviews, and an author whose nonfiction pieces I love. I can’t wait.


What’s in your bookbag this week? Do you have any exciting weekend reading plans? Let me know in the comments, and feel free to link to your own book reviews and blog posts!

Ballyhoo #1: STARLESS by Jacqueline Carey

Ballyhoo

Ballyhoo: “an excited commotion” or a brand-new blog feature? Both, obviously!

Ballyhoo is an on-again, off-again feature where I chat about an upcoming release I’m particularly excited about. Today I’m featuring a thrilling epic fantasy from one of my very favorite authors. Let’s dive in!


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Starless by Jacqueline Carey

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

Coming June 12th, 2018

Jacqueline Carey is back with an amazing adventure not seen since her New York Times bestselling Kushiel’s Legacy series. Lush and sensual, Starless introduces us to an epic world where exiled gods live among us, and a hero whose journey will resonate long after the last page is turned.

Let your mind be like the eye of the hawk…Destined from birth to serve as protector of the princess Zariya, Khai is trained in the arts of killing and stealth by a warrior sect in the deep desert; yet there is one profound truth that has been withheld from him.

In the court of the Sun-Blessed, Khai must learn to navigate deadly intrigue and his own conflicted identity…but in the far reaches of the western seas, the dark god Miasmus is rising, intent on nothing less than wholesale destruction.

If Khai is to keep his soul’s twin Zariya alive, their only hope lies with an unlikely crew of prophecy-seekers on a journey that will take them farther beneath the starless skies than anyone can imagine.

Words cannot express my undying love for Jacqueline Carey’s Kushiel’s Legacy series–the recent news that she’s planning to write a version of the first novel, Kushiel’s Dart, from love interest Joscelin’s perspective set my heart pitter-pattering–and Starless seems like it’s going to touch on everything I love about the Kushiel universe: vengeful gods, tortured-but-lovable heroes, epic journeys, and passion in all forms.

I just heard about this book this week and it’s already shot to the top of my TBR list. I think I’m even going to pre-order it to ensure that I get my mitts on it ASAP! (Money’s tight at the moment, so pre-orders are a real treat.)

Have you got your eyes set on Starless, too? What’s your ballyhoo this week? Let me know all about it in the comments–I’m always looking to add to my TBR list!

Friday Bookbag, 4.27.18

friday bookbag

Friday Bookbag is a weekly feature where I share a list of books I’ve borrowed, bought, or otherwise acquired during the week. It’s my chance to buzz about my excitement for books I might not get the chance to review.

This week my bookbag is packed with all sorts of goodies: a mind-bending short story collection, a midcentury mystery, a “dystopian” literary novel with a twist, and a memoir of the complicated legacy of missionary work in Haiti. Let’s dive in!


All the Names They Used for God by Anjali Sachdeva

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

9780399593000the premise: This collection of nine short stories spans centuries and genres is “united by each character’s struggle with fate,” according to the inside flap. The stories also explore science, religion, and the overlap between them, with settings ranging from Andrew Carnegie’s fiery steel mills to the Old West to futuristic genetic labs. At least, I think that’s the premise–short story collections are very hard to summarize before I’ve read them, so I hope I’m doing this one justice.

why I’m excited: This book’s cover is sublime, and I’m not too proud to admit that that’s what drew me in first. Second was the fact that short story collections are a delight to read; I love getting the chance to catch my breath between each story in a way that can’t happen between chapters in novels. Third, Anjali Sachdeva is playing with the boundaries of literary fiction and sci-fi in ways I find delightful. This is right up my alley.

Little Deaths by Emma Flint

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

9780316272476the premise: In the summer of 1965, the two children of Ruth Malone–a single mother and cocktail waitress–go missing. Malone herself is immediately suspect, her fashionable clothing and makeup, taste for booze, and interest in men making her a target of gossip in her tight-knit Queens, New York community. As the investigation and trial unfold, journalist Pete Wonicke is assigned to cover the case, and he finds himself increasingly entangled in Ruth’s mysterious web: is she a heartless murderer or an unlucky victim of misogyny and the rumor mill? The answer might lie in between…

why I’m excited: I eat up Midcentury stuff with a spoon (Mad Men is hugely flawed but one of my favorite shows for this reason), so a murder mystery set in 1965 New York? That’s a slam dunk for me. I also love books about journalists (check) and ones that dive deep into misogyny and the toxic and contradictory expectations we place on mothers (check). I can’t wait to get lost in this book.

Our Endless Numbered Days by Claire Fuller

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

9781941040010the premise: Peggy Hillcoat is kidnapped and taken to the middle of nowhere by her ultra-survivalist father when she is eight years old. He lies to her and tells her that the rest of the world has been destroyed, and the two share a harsh, isolated life in rural Britain for years before Peggy stumbles upon a pair of boots that lead her back to civilization, her mother, and a secret that threatens to tear her apart.

why I’m excited: I was trying to figure out why this title sounded so familiar when I realized that Our Endless Numbered Days is also the title of an Iron & Wine album. It’s the perfect title for this story, which puts a great twist on typical apocalypse stories. I grew up homeschooled on an extremely isolated and dysfunctional farm in rural Minnesota; like History of Wolves rang true for me back in October, I think this book is going to feel heartbreakingly personal, so I’ll keep a box of tissues handy when I read it.

The Gospel of Trees by Apricot Irving

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

9781451690453the premise: Apricot Irving grew up in Haiti as the daughter of an environmentalist missionary determined to reforest the country’s devastated hillsides. In The Gospel of Trees, Irving reckons with that past, writing about the bitter legacy of colonization and the unintended consequences of trying to “save” a country you barely understand.

why I’m excited: Missionary work fascinates me because it’s so contradictory. It’s a supposedly altruistic act that often has terrible consequences. It’s rife with painful family drama (The Poisonwood Bible, anyone?) even though it’s all about bringing more people into a Christian fold that idealizes family. And its racial and colonial dynamics are particularly traumatic and messy. I’m excited to read this book, both because Irving has led an interesting life and I think it will be interesting to read about, and also because I hope it will help me sort out my own complicated feelings on this subject.


What’s in your bookbag this week? Do you have any exciting weekend reading plans? Let me know in the comments, and feel free to link to your own book reviews and blog posts!

Is cataloging your home library worth it?

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Every few years I get a wild hair to document exactly how many books I own. (Spoiler alert: lots!) I’m charmed by impeccably organized shelves (yes, even the color coded ones), by personalized bookplates and meticulous handwritten lending records, and most of all, by home library catalogs that boil down all my books to one neatly alphabetized list.

It’s unsurprising, then, that I’ve tried many, many times to create a comprehensive library catalog of my own. I’ve used LibraryThing (meh), Goodreads (another meh–it’s more social network than catalog), and even Google Sheets and Excel to do it, but I always give up.

I’m a perfectionist who owns, at minimum, several hundred precious books. Cataloging them is a lot of work! Knowing how many books I have? Great. Avoiding duplicates? Double-great. Being able to look over titles and authors at a glance so I can easily come up with blog post ideas? Best of all. But even those benefits can’t quite get me over the hump of actually doing it.

Despite all that, I’m trying again. I’m using Libib.com because it’s got a clean interface and it’s free (up to about 10,000 books, that is); I’m bundling the task into spring cleaning, motivating myself by imagining old books sold back to the bookstore and new books purchased with the store credit.

Will it be worth it in the sense that cataloging my library will save me at least as much time and effort as I put into doing it? Probably not. But cataloging has always been about more than efficiency for me. It’s about the smell of old books and the realization that it’s impossible to finish everything we start.

I know I’ll never, ever read or re-read all the books on my shelves. (After all, I’m always adding more.) In a weird way, there’s something comforting about remembering that. A catalog–even a half-finished one–lets me roll around in the idea that even though I might never re-read, say, Louise Erdrich’s Love Medicine again, it’s always there just in case. I can scroll through a list of titles and authors and think happy thoughts about all the lazy afternoons I plan to spend stuffing my face with words.

Is home cataloging worth it? Not exactly. Will I do it? I’ll try. It keeps me humble.


Have you ever tried cataloging your books? Did you succeed? Worth it? Waste of time? I’d love to hear all about it in the comments!

I’m not sponsored by any of the cataloging websites and software I mentioned in this post. Opinions are all mine.

Book Review: ORPHAN MONSTER SPY by Matt Killeen

It’s hard to think of a novel I’ve read recently that seems more destined to make the leap into film than this one. Orphan Monster Spy–about a blonde and blue-eyed Jewish girl who becomes a spy at a Nazi boarding school after her mother’s murder in 1939–is a thrilling, risky, messy, wonderful firecracker of a novel. Dialogue is a weak point, and sometimes the novel’s little nods to the rise of Naziism in the U.S. today threatened to pull me out of this ostensibly historical fiction. But I can’t be too harsh–Matt Killeen works magic on every page, and Orphan Monster Spy is unlike anything else I’ve read. It’s technically YA, but I’d recommend it for anyone who loves taut, cinematic thrillers in the vein of Atomic Blonde (a.k.a. The Coldest City) and The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.

You can read my full review below.


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Orphan Monster Spy by Matt Killeen

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

  • publisher: Viking Books for Young Readers (an imprint of Penguin Random House)
  • publication date: March 20, 2018
  • length: 432 pages
  • cover price: $18.99

Finally, the car came to a stop. With difficulty, Sarah opened her eyes, blinked to clear her vision, and looked up from her hiding place in the footwell. Her mother was slumped in the driver’s seat, her head against the top of the steering wheel. She was gazing through the spokes to where Sarah crouched. Her mother’s eyes were almost the same, wide and pretty. Her pupils were so big Sarah could nearly see herself in them. But now they seemed dull. Her mother was no longer in there.

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Sometimes one book makes me fall in love with all books all over again. Orphan Monster Spy is that kind of book, not because it’s perfect, but because it’s a damn good read. Its almost unbearable tension and sadness is balanced with humor and small victories that had me pumping my fist as much as I was biting my nails.

15-year-old Sarah doesn’t keep kosher or go to synagogue, and she even has a “good Aryan” Gentile father, but she can’t erase her mother’s Jewish heritage. Trapped in the Jewish ghettos of Berlin and Vienna in the 1930s, blonde and blue-eyed Sarah and her actress mother are targets of the increasingly hostile Nazi government. When they try to make a run for the Swiss border in 1939, just before Germany invades Poland, Sarah’s mother is brutally murdered, and Sarah finds herself on the run.

That’s where the book opens, and from there, the plot moves at the speed of light. Sarah saves an enigmatic British spy from suspicious Nazis, and in turn, he protects her, employs her, and places her undercover at an elite Nazi boarding school where she must befriend the daughter of a scientist building a “grapefruit bomb” (nuclear weapon) that could level whole cities in minutes.

The setup is quick and direct, leaving plenty of time to dig deep into Sarah’s character (fascinating) and life at the Nazi boarding school (even more fascinating). The high-stakes final act, in particular, is breathtaking.

I love the breadth and depth of YA novels that exist now, more than existed even a few years ago when I was a teen. (I’m only 23!) I don’t read much YA anymore, but I picked this one up because I like WWII history and literary-ish thrillers. Boy, was I not disappointed. I was shocked at how much depth and historical detail Killeen managed to cram into this book without compromising the taut, gritty narrative. It’s a YA book that feels perfectly YA (as I define it: young protagonist, fast pace), but it’s unique and edgy enough that I’d also recommend it to someone who thinks they’re above YA. (Like myself, sort of.)

A couple of things don’t ring so true, though.

One, Killeen does the thing I hate in multilingual novels: he has characters say things in their native language (mostly German, here) and then has them immediately “repeat it” in English. It doesn’t make any sense and I wish authors would either only use words that I could pick up through context clues or would just use the English versions. I know it’s set in Germany; I don’t need to be constantly yanked out of the story by something that feels like the author being clever instead of being authentic to the characters.

Two, speaking of being authentic, this book is at times heavy-handed with its social commentary at the expense of its characters. I struggled with how to phrase this criticism because Orphan Monster Spy’s subject matter is inherently timely and social justice-y and I don’t want to ding it for that. That’s part of why I chose to read it, after all, and I wish more stories faced anti-Semitism and oppression as head-on as this one does. Still, there are times where it’s so blatant it practically breaks the fourth wall.

For example, in one conversation with Elsa, the Nazi scientist’s daughter whom Sarah is tasked with befriending, Elsa lets slip that America is full of Nazis. Sarah, deep in character as another good Nazi girl, reminds Elsa that America is not to be trusted. Elsa just laughs and tells her that American Nazis are even more dangerous than German ones because they have to hide their true colors.

I mean, I can’t fault Killeen’s accuracy on that count, but it’s such a transparent aside that it felt like it had been sung out by the gospel Greek chorus from Hercules(It certainly doesn’t feel like natural conversation.)

In the end, though, this book is so dazzlingly ambitious, smart, and compulsively readable that those things barely impacted my enjoyment of it.

Orphan Monster Spy is a desperate book for desperate times; its mission statement–take down Nazis, get revenge, survive–shouldn’t feel so relevant in 2018, but it does. For those tired of fighting the good fight, this book is a heady infusion of entertainment, energy, and pure steel. 4/5 stars.


My copy of Orphan Monster Spy came from my local library and I was in no way compensated for this review.

Friday Bookbag, 4.13.18

friday bookbag

Friday Bookbag is a weekly feature where I share a list of books I’ve borrowed, bought, or otherwise acquired during the week. It’s my chance to buzz about my excitement for books I might not get the chance to review.

This week all my library holds seemed to come in at once–I’ve got two more to pick up this afternoon that aren’t even on this list!–so I’ll be reading like mad to keep up. It’s a good thing, then, that I’ve picked out three tightly-plotted coming-of-age stories that promise to keep my eyes glued to the page from start to finish.

Let’s dive in!


The Parking Lot Attendant by Nafkote Tamirat

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

9781250128508the premise: A father and daughter, both Ethiopian immigrants, flee Boston for an island commune after the daughter becomes entangled with a parking lot attendant named Ayale–a hustler and “unofficial king of Boston’s Ethiopian community,” according to the inside flap. The Parking Lot Attendant is a suspenseful coming-of-age story about immigration, national identity, and the choices and unforeseen consequences that shape all of us.

why I’m excited: This is a slim book–only 240 pages–that promises to pack a punch; it’s already received praise for being an unusual and interesting take on the coming-of-age story, a really saturated sub-genre. I’m particularly excited to read about the commune aspect–I’m fascinated by communes and off-the-grid living–and about the narrator’s struggle to navigate her Ethiopian identity in America.

Gun Love by Jennifer Clement

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

9781524761684the premise: A mother and daughter live out of their car at a trailer park in central Florida, the daughter Pearl in the front seat, her mother in the back. It’s a difficult life made more difficult by the intoxicating, menacing presence of guns: guns owned for all sorts of reasons and guns that trigger a shocking act of violence that turns Pearl’s life upside-down. (P.S.: isn’t it so funny that this cover looks so similar to The Parking Lot Attendant‘s? They’re both fiery coming-of-age novels, so it makes sense.)

why I’m excited: A novel about gun violence in the U.S. couldn’t be more topical right now, and best of all, it seems that Clement will interweave that theme with a story that’s genuinely nuanced and compelling (making it much more than just an “issue novel”). The premise also put me in mind of The Florida Projecta film about a mother and daughter struggling to make ends meet living in a motel in central Florida. That movie is streaming on Amazon Prime; I haven’t seen it yet, but it’s currently at the top of my to-watch list, and I’m hoping Gun Love will strike the same notes.

Orphan Monster Spy by Matt Killeen

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

9780451478733the premise: It’s 1939 Germany, and the Holocaust has just begun. Sarah, a blonde and blue-eyed Jewish girl, burns for revenge after her mother, an actress, is murdered at a checkpoint. She’s soon recruited as a spy by a mysterious man who needs her to infiltrate an elite boarding school attended by the daughters of Nazi leaders so that she can uncover the blueprints to a devastating bomb that could turn the tide of the war.

why I’m excited: It’s yet another thrilling coming-of-age novel: just take a minute or two to absorb that premise! It’s hard to imagine a more intriguing backdrop for a story that also promises to tackle tough questions of identity, revenge, and survival. It’s appalling to me that today in 2018, Nazism is on the rise all over again. Orphan Monster Spy feels like an urgent antidote to the anti-Semitic hate that has killed millions and might kill millions again if we’re not careful. I’m planning to clear my calendar for an afternoon read this in as close to one setting as I can manage–I hope it lives up to the hype I’ve built up for it in my mind.


What’s in your bookbag this week? Do you have any exciting weekend reading plans? Let me know in the comments, and feel free to link to your own book reviews and blog posts!

In Review: March 2018

I don’t know about you, but link roundups make me feel like I am On Top Of Things™ somehow–like taking a few minutes to skim headlines and summaries could somehow keep me afloat in an internet that moves at the speed of light. Maybe that’s a bad habit, but I’ve decided to introduce a link roundup of my own at the end of every month just in case anyone out there enjoys the same thing.

March was a tough month for me, where reading and writing–and frankly, just getting through the day–were monumental tasks, but I’m out the other side feeling stronger and excited about what’s ahead for me and this blog.

Without further ado (and for your skimming pleasure), here’s my March in Review.

 

I read 4 books this month:

  • Bipolar Faith: A Black Woman’s Journey with Depression and Faith by Monica Coleman (Goodreads)
  • A Quick & Easy Guide to They/Them Pronouns by Archie Bongiovanni and Tristan Jimerson (Goodreads)
  • Kushiel’s Scion by Jacqueline Carey (Goodreads)
  • The Tangled Lands by Paolo Bacigalupi and Tobias S. Buckell (Goodreads)

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I reviewed 1 book this month:

 

I checked out 3 books from the library:

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I bought 1 book: 

I read 0 short stories. Better luck next month!

I have read 15 books so far in 2018!


How was your month in books? Feel free to link to your own blog posts in the comments!